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Examples of Cybercrimes

By Carlos Gamino

The phrase cybercrime really covers a lot. It can refer to any number of crimes that a person uses a computer or connected device to commit, as well as a crime that targets a computer, network or connected device. But what are some examples of cybercrimes? This guide lists three.

Examples of Cybercrimes

Some of the most common cybercrimes include password trafficking, cyberbullying and cyberextortion. Here’s a closer look at each.

Password Trafficking

Password trafficking is a crime in which a person uses a computer or computerized device to steal another person’s passwords, and it’s a form of cybercrime. Here’s an example:

A person creates a program that sends emails that look a lot like emails that come from a well-known financial institution. The emails ask users to visit a site and enter their online login information. Though the users don’t know it, they’re actually entering their online login information to a sham site – one that’s not related to their bank at all. The person who created the program then collects this information. Even if the person does not use the information they collect, they can be charged with (and convicted of) a cybercrime.

Related: Is computer hacking a crime?

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying is bullying that occurs online rather than in-person or through other mediums. Acts of cyberbullying in Wisconsin can be charged as harassment. Here’s an example:

Two people disagree on some fundamental issues, and both are in the same Facebook group. One person decides to spread rumors about the other in the Facebook group, and several people pile on and say mean, rude and hurtful things to the victim. They write harassing comments and send her messages about the disagreement, as well as share private or embarrassing photos online. The original person who spread the rumors and everyone who “piled on” can be found guilty of cyberbullying, depending on their roles (including what they each said) in the online activity.

Related: What is the penalty for computer hacking?

Cyberextortion

Cyberextortion is the act of shaking down one or more people. That means demanding payment to prevent some type of malicious activity. Here’s an example:

You receive an email that says someone has accessed your browser history. The person who claims to have done so says that if you pay them a certain amount of money, they won’t release what they’ve discovered to everyone in your address book. This can occur whether or not the person actually has access to your browser history or your personal information; in many cases, the person has no information and is simply trying to trick a victim.

Have You Been Accused of a Cybercrime?

If you’ve been accused of committing a cybercrime, you need to know that the penalties of a conviction can be very harsh – and it may be in your best interest to get in touch with a cybercrime defense attorney right away. Call our office at 414-383-6700 to schedule your free consultation now; we may be able to help you.

Attorney Carlos Gamino

By |2022-01-28T13:16:41-06:00December 14th, 2021|Criminal Law|Comments Off on Examples of Cybercrimes

Types of Cybercrimes in Wisconsin

By Carlos Gamino

If you’re like many people, you’ve heard that computer crimes – often called cybercrimes – come with serious penalties. But what, exactly, are cybercrimes, and what are the punishments associated with them? This guide explains.

Types of Cybercrimes in Wisconsin

There are several types of cybercrimes. Generally, if you use a computer, phone, tablet or other connected device to commit a crime, it can be considered a cybercrime in Wisconsin. Additionally, if the target of a crime is a computer or another connected device, your crime may be considered a cybercrime. These are some of the most commonly charged cybercrimes in our state:

  • Email and internet fraud
  • Identity fraud
  • Theft of financial data, such as credit card and account numbers
  • Theft and sale of corporate data
  • Cyberextortion (extorting money to prevent a cyberattack)
  • Cryptojacking (mining cryptocurrency using resources you don’t own)
  • Cyberespionage (spying)

Each of these crimes is punishable under Wisconsin law – and the penalties may be harsher than you think.

Related: What’s the punishment for computer hacking?

Penalties for Various Types of Cybercrimes in Wisconsin

A wide range of penalties are available to judges who try cybercrime cases in Wisconsin. Some cybercrimes are Class A misdemeanors, which can result in up to 9 months in jail and fines of up to $10,000. However, some crimes are felonies – in fact, if:

  • A cybercrime is committed to defraud or to obtain property, it’s generally a Class I felony
  • The cybercrime results in damage valued at more than $2,500, it’s a Class F felony
  • The crime interrupts or impairs government operations, public communication, transportation, or a supply of water, gas or another public service, it’s a Class F felony
  • The cybercrime creates a substantial and unreasonable risk of death or great bodily harm to one or more people, it’s a Class F felony

Related: Computer hacking penalties and more

What if You’re Charged With a Type of Cybercrime?

If you’re charged with any of these types of cybercrime in Wisconsin, your best bet may be talking to an attorney about your situation. Your lawyer can give you the case-specific legal advice you need to get the best possible outcome on your case. Call our office at 414-383-6700 now to schedule your free cybercrime consultation.

Attorney Carlos Gamino

By |2022-01-28T13:23:02-06:00December 12th, 2021|Criminal Law|Comments Off on Types of Cybercrimes in Wisconsin

What is Computer Hacking, and is It a Crime?

By Attorney Carlos Gamino

We’ve all seen movies and TV shows where hackers crack the code into a top-secret system, copy vital information, or change data – and if you’re like most people, you probably know that’s a crime. But how serious is it, and will you go to prison if you’re caught hacking into a computer system for any reason? Here’s what you need to know.

What is Computer Hacking?

Computer hacking is a term that describes accessing another person’s computer and data without permission. You can be charged with hacking if you willfully, knowingly and without authorization:

  • Modify data, computer programs or supporting documentation
  • Destroy data, computer programs or supporting documentation
  • Access computer programs or supporting documentation
  • Take possession of data, computer programs or supporting documentation
  • Copy data, computer programs or supporting documentation
  • Disclose restricted access codes or other restricted access information to unauthorized persons
  • Cause an interruption in service by submitting a message, or multiple messages, to a computer, computer program, computer system, or computer network that exceeds the processing capacity of the computer, computer program, computer system, or computer network

Is it Illegal to Look at Someone Else’s Computer Files Without Their Permission?

It’s illegal to view another person’s password-protected files, including email. That means even if you share a computer, you can’t log into someone else’s email account and start reading.

What is the Punishment for Computer Hacking?

Computer hacking is usually a Class A misdemeanor, and that means you could spend up to 9 months in jail. The court could also sentence you to pay a fine of up to $10,000. However, in some cases, computer hacking is a felony. It becomes a:

  • Class I felony if you do it to defraud or obtain property
  • Class F felony if it results in damage valued at more than $2,500
  • Class F felony if it causes an interruption or impairment of government operations or public communication, of transportation, or of a supply of water, gas or another public service
  • Class F felony if it creates a substantial and unreasonable risk of death or great bodily harm to another person

Do You Need to Talk to an Attorney About Computer Hacking Charges?

If you’ve been accused of a computer crime – including computer hacking – we may be able to help you. Call 414-383-6700 for a free consultation; you can ask us your questions and we can start developing a strategy that gets you the best possible outcome.

Carlos Gamino

By |2021-08-08T14:16:45-05:00May 31st, 2021|Criminal Law|Comments Off on What is Computer Hacking, and is It a Crime?

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